Silence

Mark 15:42-47  It was Preparation Day (that is, the day before the Sabbath). So as evening approached, Joseph of Arimathea, a prominent member of the Council, who was himself waiting for the kingdom of God, went boldly to Pilate and asked for Jesus’ body. Pilate was surprised to hear that he was already dead. Summoning the centurion, he asked him if Jesus had already died. When he learned from the centurion that it was so, he gave the body to Joseph. So Joseph bought some linen cloth, took down the body, wrapped it in the linen, and placed it in a tomb cut out of rock. Then he rolled a stone against the entrance of the tomb.  Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joseph saw where he was laid.

God is working in the silence.

It happens often. You’re in the middle of a texting or direct messaging situation, going back and forth with a friend, a family member, a colleague, or a neighbor, and the conversation is like a ping-pong ball, back and forth, back and forth. But then, you ask a question or make a comment, and instead of a sudden response, you see this: …. Three dots in a bubble. And you wait. And watch. And wait. It means the person saw your message, and he or she is in the middle of responding. But the “…” can make you uneasy. Unsure. Especially if it lasts a while. When will the words appear?

But when will the Word appear?

Holy Saturday is God’s “…”

Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John are silent. None of the gospels tell us of anything that took place on Holy Saturday. Thursday’s events of the Last Supper, Gethsemane, and Judas’ betrayal are clear. And then Friday leaves us at the tomb, laying Jesus’ body there, trying to beat the sun going down. But Saturday? No words are spoken. Nobody in the story knows exactly what is coming anyway. There is only silence. But silence doesn’t mean nothing is happening.

In fact, just the opposite is true.

Here we sit in relentless silence. Perhaps you know the feeling. Perhaps you wait on God’s “…” too. Silence is a symbol of the “already but not yet” of God’s Kingdom on earth, a foretaste of the time between Jesus’ ascension and second coming, and a reminder that God is not yet finished speaking -- for he is far from finished working.

After all, he remains relentless.

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